Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: January 2018 Health Newsletter

January 2018 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» Chiropractic Services Relieve Low Back Pain in Female Veterans
» Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure
» Chiropractic For Persistent Headache

» Vitamin E Helpful In Treating Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

Chiropractic Services Relieve Low Back Pain in Female Veterans

Chiropractic Services Relieve Low Back Pain in Female Veterans: Study Legislation to expand access to chiropractic in the VA gains new momentum
Arlington, Va.- A new study finds that female veterans—one of the fastest growing populations receiving treatment through the Veterans Administration (VA) health care system—experience improvement in low back pain with a course of chiropractic care, according to the American Chiropractic Association (ACA).  Published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, the study’s authors note that musculoskeletal conditions such as back pain are the most common ailments among female veterans. They also report that female veterans on average access VA medical care more frequently than male veterans, have a higher outpatient cost per patient and have a higher rate of service-connected disability.  "Although further research is warranted," the study says, "chiropractic care may be of value in contributing to the pain management needs of this unique patient population."  Chiropractic services are one of the conservative (non-drug) treatment options for pain offered in the VA. They are available at half of the major VA medical facilities in the United States.  Efforts to expand chiropractic services to veterans recently gained new momentum in Congress. Rep. Julia Brownley (D-CA), ranking member of the Veterans Subcommittee on Health, and Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA), have joined forces to broaden the range of services and care options available to veterans by supporting the Chiropractic Care Available to All Veterans Act (H.R. 103). The bill—supported by several major veterans groups—would require chiropractic services to be offered at all U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers and codify chiropractic care as a standard benefit for veterans using VA health care. There is a bipartisan companion bill in the Senate (S. 609).  "Chiropractic's non-drug, non-addictive and noninvasive approach to pain management can help alleviate disabling pain and improve function," says ACA President David Herd, DC. "That's why chiropractors are an important part of the health care team in the VA."  Chiropractors focus on disorders of the musculoskeletal system, most often treating complaints such as back pain, neck pain, pain in the joints of the arms or legs and headaches. Widely known for their expertise in spinal manipulation, chiropractors are also trained to recommend therapeutic and rehabilitative exercises, and to provide dietary and lifestyle counseling.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: acatoday.org
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association 2017


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Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

March 16, 2007 -- A special chiropractic adjustment can significantly lower high blood pressure, a placebo-controlled study suggests.

"This procedure has the effect of not one, but two blood-pressure medications given in combination," study leader George Bakris, MD, tells WebMD. "And it seems to be adverse-event free. We saw no side effects and no problems," adds Bakris, director of the University of Chicago hypertension center.

Eight weeks after undergoing the procedure, 25 patients with early-stage high blood pressure had significantly lower blood pressure than 25 similar patients who underwent a sham chiropractic adjustment. Because patients can't feel the technique, they were unable to tell which group they were in.

X-rays showed that the procedure realigned the Atlas vertebra -- the doughnut-like bone at the very top of the spine -- with the spine in the treated patients, but not in the sham-treated patients.

Compared to the sham-treated patients, those who got the real procedure saw an average 14 mm Hg greater drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure count), and an average 8 mm Hg greater drop in diastolic blood pressure (the bottom blood pressure number).

None of the patients took blood pressure medicine during the eight-week study.

"When the statistician brought me the data, I actually didn't believe it. It was way too good to be true," Bakris says. "The statistician said, 'I don't even believe it.' But we checked for everything, and there it was."

Bakris and colleagues report their findings in the advance online issue of the Journal of Human Hypertension.

Atlas Adjustment and Hypertension

The procedure calls for adjustment of the C-1 vertebra. It's called the Atlas vertebra because it holds up the head, just as the titan Atlas holds up the world in Greek mythology.

Marshall Dickholtz Sr., DC, of the Chiropractic Health Center, in Chicago, is the 84-year-old chiropractor who performed all the procedures in the study. He calls the Atlas vertebra "the fuse box to the body."

"At the base of the brain are two centers that control all the muscles of the body. If you pinch the base of the brain -- if the Atlas gets locked in a position as little as a half a millimeter out of line -- it doesn't cause any pain but it upsets these centers," Dickholtz tells WebMD.

The subtle adjustment is practiced by the very small subgroup of chiropractors certified in National Upper Cervical Chiropractic (NUCCA) techniques. The procedure employs precise measurements to determine a patient's Atlas vertebra alignment. If realignment is deemed necessary, the chiropractor uses his or her hands to gently manipulate the vertebra.

"We are not doctors. We are spinal engineers," Dickholtz says. "We use mathematics, geometry, and physics to learn how to slide everything back into place."

What does this have to do with high blood pressure pressure?

Bakris notes that some researchers have suggested that injury to the Atlas vertebra can affect blood flow in the arteries at the base of the skull. Dickholtz thinks the misaligned Atlas triggers release of signals that make the arteries contract. Whether the procedure actually fixes such injuries is unknown, Bakris says.

Bakris began the study after a fellow doctor told him that something strange was happening in his family practice. The doctor had been sending some of his patients to a chiropractor. Some of these patients had high blood pressure. 

Yet after seeing the chiropractor, the patients' blood pressure had normalized -- and a few of them were able to stop taking their blood pressure medications.

So Bakris, then at Rush University, designed the pilot study with 50 patients. He's now organizing a much bigger clinical trial.

"Is it going to be for everybody with high blood pressure? No," Bakris says. "We clearly need to identify those who can benefit. It is pretty clear that some kind of head or neck trauma early in life is related to this. This is really a work in progress. It is certainly in the early stages of research."

Dickholtz has been teaching, practicing, and studying the NUCCA technique for 50 years. He says high blood pressure is far from the only thing an Atlas misalignment causes.

"On the other hand, if people have high blood pressure, there is a tremendous possibility they need an Atlas adjustment," he says.

 

 

Author: www.WebMD.com Health News by Daniel J. DeNoon
Source: Rush University Hypertension Center Chicago IL
Copyright: Journal Of Human Hypertension 3


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Chiropractic For Persistent Headache


Most people are aware that chiropractors are experts in dealing with back issues. As shown in a recent case study published in the Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, chiropractors are also equally trained in successfully diagnosing and treating many cases of headaches. In this case study, chiropractic care was delivered to a 54-year-old woman suffering from chronic debilitating headaches for the previous 11 months. After just five chiropractic manipulative therapy and adjunct treatments over 6 weeks, the patient experienced resolution of the headaches. If you or someone you know if suffering from headaches, call your local chiropractor today for a no obligation consultation.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of Chiropractic Medicine Volume 12, Issue 4. December 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Vitamin E Helpful In Treating Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease


In a new double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial involving 613 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Vitamin E was shown to slow the functional decline of Alzheimer's. AD affects approximately 5 million older Americans and is marked by irreversible, progressive deterioration in memory and thinking skills. In this study, mild to moderate AD patients received either 2,000 IUs of vitamin E daily or a placebo. Over the average follow-up time of 2.3 years, researchers estimated those patients receiving the vitamin E had slowed their functional decline in activities of daily living (ADLs) by 19%. ADLs include things such as making meals, getting dressed and holding a conversation. According to researchers, this translated into a delay in progression of mild to moderate AD by 6.2 months. Another significant finding was that caregiver time was reduced by approximately 2 hours per day in the vitamin E group. Previous studies have also shown Vitamin E effective in those with moderately severe AD. It's important to note that those considering vitamin E supplementation to treat AD only do so under the supervision of a physician as vitamin E can interfere with blood thinners, cholesterol drugs and other medications.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA. 2014;311(1):33-44.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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