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» Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure
» Back Pain Increases As Children and Adolescents Age
» Study Reveals Majority of U.S. Adults Inclined to Visit a Chiropractor
» Boost Performance - Eat Your Breakfast

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

March 16, 2007 -- A special chiropractic adjustment can significantly lower high blood pressure, a placebo-controlled study suggests.

"This procedure has the effect of not one, but two blood-pressure medications given in combination," study leader George Bakris, MD, tells WebMD. "And it seems to be adverse-event free. We saw no side effects and no problems," adds Bakris, director of the University of Chicago hypertension center.

Eight weeks after undergoing the procedure, 25 patients with early-stage high blood pressure had significantly lower blood pressure than 25 similar patients who underwent a sham chiropractic adjustment. Because patients can't feel the technique, they were unable to tell which group they were in.

X-rays showed that the procedure realigned the Atlas vertebra -- the doughnut-like bone at the very top of the spine -- with the spine in the treated patients, but not in the sham-treated patients.

Compared to the sham-treated patients, those who got the real procedure saw an average 14 mm Hg greater drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure count), and an average 8 mm Hg greater drop in diastolic blood pressure (the bottom blood pressure number).

None of the patients took blood pressure medicine during the eight-week study.

"When the statistician brought me the data, I actually didn't believe it. It was way too good to be true," Bakris says. "The statistician said, 'I don't even believe it.' But we checked for everything, and there it was."

Bakris and colleagues report their findings in the advance online issue of the Journal of Human Hypertension.

Atlas Adjustment and Hypertension

The procedure calls for adjustment of the C-1 vertebra. It's called the Atlas vertebra because it holds up the head, just as the titan Atlas holds up the world in Greek mythology.

Marshall Dickholtz Sr., DC, of the Chiropractic Health Center, in Chicago, is the 84-year-old chiropractor who performed all the procedures in the study. He calls the Atlas vertebra "the fuse box to the body."

"At the base of the brain are two centers that control all the muscles of the body. If you pinch the base of the brain -- if the Atlas gets locked in a position as little as a half a millimeter out of line -- it doesn't cause any pain but it upsets these centers," Dickholtz tells WebMD.

The subtle adjustment is practiced by the very small subgroup of chiropractors certified in National Upper Cervical Chiropractic (NUCCA) techniques. The procedure employs precise measurements to determine a patient's Atlas vertebra alignment. If realignment is deemed necessary, the chiropractor uses his or her hands to gently manipulate the vertebra.

"We are not doctors. We are spinal engineers," Dickholtz says. "We use mathematics, geometry, and physics to learn how to slide everything back into place."

What does this have to do with high blood pressure pressure?

Bakris notes that some researchers have suggested that injury to the Atlas vertebra can affect blood flow in the arteries at the base of the skull. Dickholtz thinks the misaligned Atlas triggers release of signals that make the arteries contract. Whether the procedure actually fixes such injuries is unknown, Bakris says.

Bakris began the study after a fellow doctor told him that something strange was happening in his family practice. The doctor had been sending some of his patients to a chiropractor. Some of these patients had high blood pressure. 

Yet after seeing the chiropractor, the patients' blood pressure had normalized -- and a few of them were able to stop taking their blood pressure medications.

So Bakris, then at Rush University, designed the pilot study with 50 patients. He's now organizing a much bigger clinical trial.

"Is it going to be for everybody with high blood pressure? No," Bakris says. "We clearly need to identify those who can benefit. It is pretty clear that some kind of head or neck trauma early in life is related to this. This is really a work in progress. It is certainly in the early stages of research."

Dickholtz has been teaching, practicing, and studying the NUCCA technique for 50 years. He says high blood pressure is far from the only thing an Atlas misalignment causes.

"On the other hand, if people have high blood pressure, there is a tremendous possibility they need an Atlas adjustment," he says.

 

 

Author: www.WebMD.com Health News by Daniel J. DeNoon
Source: Rush University Hypertension Center Chicago IL
Copyright: Journal Of Human Hypertension 3


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Back Pain Increases As Children and Adolescents Age

With all the studies evaluating the prevalence and cause of back pain, few have focused on back pain in our children and adolescents and none have been conducted on a larger scale.  Fortunately, this changed when doctors at the Hospital of Special Surgery in New York City surveyed 3,669 children and adolescents across the United States.  Their goal was to establish the prevalence of back pain in 10-18 year olds as well as identify any demographic or physical activity factors.  Their findings revealed that overall, 29% of the boys experienced back pain in the previous year.  Perhaps more surprisingly, this number rose to 38% in the girls.  Additionally, the occurrence of back pain increased steadily with the age of the children/adolescents.  Almost 80% of those studied stated they participated in a sport or physical activity.  As the level of competition increased and became more intense (travel teams vs. recreational athletes), so too did the occurrence of back pain.  Additionally, there was a strong correlation between the incidence of back pain and the style of backpack used.  Those using a two strap backpack were less likely to experience back pain as compared with those using rolling backpacks with two straps and the waistband fastened, or, those using backpacks with a single strap.  The data collected from this study shed light on the serious risk our youth face when it comes to back injuries.  Chiropractors undergo years of extensive study and training to identify and treat back pain, in both adults and children.  In fact, of those youth surveyed above who experienced back pain within the last year, approximately 34% sought chiropractic care.  If your child or adolescent is or has experienced back pain, we encourage you to schedule a no-commitment consultation with a licensed doctor of chiropractic today!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. March 12, 2019
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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Study Reveals Majority of U.S. Adults Inclined to Visit a Chiropractor

Millions of U.S. adults would choose chiropractic care first to treat neck or back pain, according to a recent nationwide survey. The Gallup-Palmer report revealed 57% of all U.S. adults believe in the effectiveness of treatment and are likely to visit a chiropractor. Over 50% of adults have visited a chiropractic doctor in the past, and over 25% would choose a chiropractor over any other type of doctor if they experienced back or neck pain. The nationally representative survey, commissioned by the Palmer College of Chiropractic in Iowa, also found that more adults are seeking chiropractic treatment than previously estimated. The survey found that 33.6 million Americans visited a chiropractor in 2014, up from the 2012 estimate of 20.6 million Americans. Chiropractic care takes a trained, conservative approach to the treatment of neuromusculoskeltal concerns, limiting the need for prescription painkillers or surgery. However, about four in ten U.S. adults reported concerns about cost, and nearly half did not know whether their insurance plan covered chiropractic services. According to the American Chiropractic Association (ACA), numerous recent studies refute these misconceptions. The ACA reports that chiropractic care is at least partially covered by most insurance plans and is considered a cost-effective form of treatment for back and neck pain.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Acatoday.org, online September 08, 2015
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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Boost Performance - Eat Your Breakfast

Skipping breakfast can lead to a reduced athletic performance later in the day according to U.K. researchers.  In a group of 10 males, researchers compared performance later in the day when eating breakfast as well as when skipping breakfast.  In this particular group of individuals, when breakfast was skipped, even though more calories tended to be consumed during lunch (an average of approximately 200 additional calories), their later day performance was still reduced.  More studies will need to be performed but if you're an athlete with an athletic performance later it the day, making a decision to skip breakfast may reduce your overall performance, even if more calories are consumed later in the day.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, online May 12, 2015.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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