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» Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure
» Study Proves Chiropractic Care Minimizes Opioid Dependence
» Rear-Facing Car Seats Increase Child Safety During Real-Impact Collisions
» Active Kids Think Better

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

March 16, 2007 -- A special chiropractic adjustment can significantly lower high blood pressure, a placebo-controlled study suggests.

"This procedure has the effect of not one, but two blood-pressure medications given in combination," study leader George Bakris, MD, tells WebMD. "And it seems to be adverse-event free. We saw no side effects and no problems," adds Bakris, director of the University of Chicago hypertension center.

Eight weeks after undergoing the procedure, 25 patients with early-stage high blood pressure had significantly lower blood pressure than 25 similar patients who underwent a sham chiropractic adjustment. Because patients can't feel the technique, they were unable to tell which group they were in.

X-rays showed that the procedure realigned the Atlas vertebra -- the doughnut-like bone at the very top of the spine -- with the spine in the treated patients, but not in the sham-treated patients.

Compared to the sham-treated patients, those who got the real procedure saw an average 14 mm Hg greater drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure count), and an average 8 mm Hg greater drop in diastolic blood pressure (the bottom blood pressure number).

None of the patients took blood pressure medicine during the eight-week study.

"When the statistician brought me the data, I actually didn't believe it. It was way too good to be true," Bakris says. "The statistician said, 'I don't even believe it.' But we checked for everything, and there it was."

Bakris and colleagues report their findings in the advance online issue of the Journal of Human Hypertension.

Atlas Adjustment and Hypertension

The procedure calls for adjustment of the C-1 vertebra. It's called the Atlas vertebra because it holds up the head, just as the titan Atlas holds up the world in Greek mythology.

Marshall Dickholtz Sr., DC, of the Chiropractic Health Center, in Chicago, is the 84-year-old chiropractor who performed all the procedures in the study. He calls the Atlas vertebra "the fuse box to the body."

"At the base of the brain are two centers that control all the muscles of the body. If you pinch the base of the brain -- if the Atlas gets locked in a position as little as a half a millimeter out of line -- it doesn't cause any pain but it upsets these centers," Dickholtz tells WebMD.

The subtle adjustment is practiced by the very small subgroup of chiropractors certified in National Upper Cervical Chiropractic (NUCCA) techniques. The procedure employs precise measurements to determine a patient's Atlas vertebra alignment. If realignment is deemed necessary, the chiropractor uses his or her hands to gently manipulate the vertebra.

"We are not doctors. We are spinal engineers," Dickholtz says. "We use mathematics, geometry, and physics to learn how to slide everything back into place."

What does this have to do with high blood pressure pressure?

Bakris notes that some researchers have suggested that injury to the Atlas vertebra can affect blood flow in the arteries at the base of the skull. Dickholtz thinks the misaligned Atlas triggers release of signals that make the arteries contract. Whether the procedure actually fixes such injuries is unknown, Bakris says.

Bakris began the study after a fellow doctor told him that something strange was happening in his family practice. The doctor had been sending some of his patients to a chiropractor. Some of these patients had high blood pressure. 

Yet after seeing the chiropractor, the patients' blood pressure had normalized -- and a few of them were able to stop taking their blood pressure medications.

So Bakris, then at Rush University, designed the pilot study with 50 patients. He's now organizing a much bigger clinical trial.

"Is it going to be for everybody with high blood pressure? No," Bakris says. "We clearly need to identify those who can benefit. It is pretty clear that some kind of head or neck trauma early in life is related to this. This is really a work in progress. It is certainly in the early stages of research."

Dickholtz has been teaching, practicing, and studying the NUCCA technique for 50 years. He says high blood pressure is far from the only thing an Atlas misalignment causes.

"On the other hand, if people have high blood pressure, there is a tremendous possibility they need an Atlas adjustment," he says.

 

 

Author: www.WebMD.com Health News by Daniel J. DeNoon
Source: Rush University Hypertension Center Chicago IL
Copyright: Journal Of Human Hypertension 3


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Study Proves Chiropractic Care Minimizes Opioid Dependence

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine has published a study that formalizes the efficacy of chiropractic care in reducing opioid usage among adults with low back pain. The study, which included over 13,000 adults, found that patients receiving chiropractic care for low back pain (LBP) filled opioid analgesic prescriptions 55 percent less often than those not receiving chiropractic care. Overall, the research indicated chiropractic pain management practices can reduce or eliminate the need for opioid pain relievers, resulting in fewer risks and reduced patient costs. Key findings included:

  • Only 19 percent of patients under chiropractic care filled prescriptions for opioids in contrast to the subjects not under chiropractic care, of which 35 percent filled opioid prescriptions.
  • When considering all types of prescriptions, the group under chiropractic care filled significantly fewer prescriptions than the non-chiropractic care group. 

With over 2 million people in the U.S. suffering from opioid addiction and 15% of the population fearing addiction to opioids, finding safe and cost-effective methods of managing pain is critical. Chiropractic care, along with other drug-free therapies, has been recommended by the Institute of Medicine to treat patients presenting with chronic pain. Guidelines from the American College of Physicians are even more explicit on recommendations for treating back pain, clarifying non-pharmacologic treatment as the primary choice. Opioids are considered as a last resort only, or in cases where patients’ complicating factors make other options incompatible. If you’re suffering from back pain, contact a chiropractic near you to help manage your pain safely, effectively, and without drugs.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. doi:10.1089/acm.2017.0131
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Rear-Facing Car Seats Increase Child Safety During Real-Impact Collisions

Until recently, the call for rear-facing carseats has been predicated on results garnered from side-impact and head-on accidents, which are deadliest. However, a rear-impact collision has potential to cause head-and-neck injuries in infants and toddlers when the back-and-forth motion of the impact causes a whiplash effect. Experts agree that infants and toddlers should remain seated in rear-facing carseats until they’ve reached the age of two or until they’re too big to be positioned correctly for maximum front- and side-impact protection. A new study by Julie Mansfield of the Injury Biomechanics Research Center of Wexner Medical Center now proves this rear-facing position is protective even when the car is impacted from behind. The study used a crash-test dummy to demonstrate how crash energy is absorbed through the rear-facing seat to keep the child’s head, neck, and spine safely aligned. Employing four of the most commonly-used U.S. carseats, the study recreated a series of rear-impact collisions that found all four carseats, when used in the rear-facing position, allowed the crash energy to travel through the carseat and vehicle seat, reducing crash forces on the child’s body. In this scenario, the child is cradled by the seat, allowing the energy of the crash to be distributed evenly over the child’s back. Because the carseat and child move as one unit, the head and spine remain supported. These results should assure parents that keeping their children in rear-facing seats for as long as possible is the best way to protect them from injuries sustained in any collision scenario.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: SAE International, online April 3, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Active Kids Think Better


According to researchers, children who participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity not only benefit physically, they also improve their cognitive performance and brain function. Results from a new study involving 221 children aged 7 to 9 show regular participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity increases their ability to block out distractions, increase focus and improve their multi-tasking skills. U.S. and European exercise guidelines for children and teens currently call for a minimum of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. If you're a parent with a child or teen, encourage and assist them in becoming and staying physically active. Enroll them in after school programs that involve physical activity. Get them into a sports league. Join the YMCA. Take them to the park. Play in the back yard. Be safe but definitely be active!


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Pediatrics, online September 29, 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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